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Cash’s ‘American Recordings’ coming to box-set

A box set of Johnny Cash’s American Recordings career is being released as a vinyl box-set, pressed on 180-gram vinyl. The 7xLP set is cut from the original masters, under the supervision of Rick Rubin. This looks like just the reissues they’ve already released individually in a set form.

The set is being released on February 24th.

Source: Modern Vinyl

We know that vinyl is back, but now the demand for retro is leading to some extraordinary prices. As LP sales return to a level not seen for almost 20 years, a small west London vinyl-only record label is busy producing handmade limited-edition albums that sell for up to £2,500.

A gangly figure with a remarkably luxuriant beard, label owner Pete Hutchison looks like a man out of time sitting in his small Notting Hill studio surrounded by beautifully restored vintage equipment. The set up includes a BTR-2 reel-to-reel tape machine used at Abbey Road Studios on landmark recordings by the likes of The Beatles.

Hutchison’s passion for 33.3rpm vinyl discs, a format introduced by Columbia back in 1948, knows no bounds.

Click here to read the rest of the article in the independent.

A super deluxe limited edition pressing of this landmark space rock album by super group Captain Beyond!

Formed in 1971 by members of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly & Johnny Winter’s band, Captain Beyond is heavy, spacey and most definitely FAR OUT!

Numbered, Limited Edition on Random Colored Vinyl. Sequentially numbered and presented in a gorgeous black velvet gate fold jacket with silver foil stamping and a 180 gram colored vinyl with audio that’s been remastered specifically for this edition!


The Grammy Award-winning pop icon is currently working on her 13th studio album. Unfinished demos from the forthcoming offering were leaked onto the Internet this week and Madonna is incensed over the violation of privacy.

“This is artistic rape!” she wrote in an Instagram post on Wednesday, which has since been deleted. “These are early leaked demos, half of which won’t even make it on my album. The other half have changed and evolved. This is a form of terrorism. Wtf!!!! Why do people want to destroy artistic process??? Why steal? Why not give me the opportunity to finish and give you my very best?”

Madonna closed out the angry dialogue on a lighter note by thanking her fans. The star appreciates those who have remained loyal to her work over the years.

“Thank you for not listening! Thank you for your loyalty! Thank you for waiting and if you have heard please know they are unfinished demos stolen long ago and not ready to be presented to the world,” she wrote in another Instagram post.

The 56-year-old Material Girl last traveled internationally performing shows on her The MDNA Tour in 2012 and a recent report claims Madonna is in early talks to start touring again next year, after she releases her fresh record.

This is going to be one very special tour. Madonna wants to pull out all the stops, especially because it is 30 years since the Virgin Tour, a source told British newspaper The Mirror recently.

Like her 2012 MDNA tour, where she played 88 dates in places including Europe, South America and Asia, Madge will be travelling the world. Once the new record is finished she can concentrate on the concerts.

Source: Music News

6419f-zzzTalk of vinyl records making a comeback has been going on for some time. With a new generation appreciating the intricate sound quality and the hands-on approach of putting needle to record instead of shuffling an iPod, record sales have increased by 49% from last year. That said, the comeback may be taking its toll.

The releases may be new, but the machines printing them are old. Only about 15 factories still press records daily, and with older equipment and excessive demand, breakdowns and supply shortages frequently delay the pressing of your favorite new album. Robert Roczynski runs a factory that makes parts for record makers, and his employees have been working overtime to fill the new orders. With the increase in vinyl, entrepreneurs still haven’t been inspired to keep the industry running from the ground up by investing in ways to keep production going and update old machines. As Rocynski states, “They’re trying to bring the industry back, but the era has gone by.”

For the rest of the article, click here

http://cdn.xenlife.com.au/wp-content/uploads/crate-digging.jpg

Ever see a movie where the protagonist wasn’t born, or the USSR won the Cold War, and the alternate future is different from the present day? Think back to Doc Brown using a chalkboard to draw tangential, alternate futures for Marty McFly in Back to the Future. Well, imagine if vinyl records were a hard-to-find niche product, and pressing plants were operating with capacity to spare.

It could have happened.

Anticipating a change and in search of new physical and hybrid offerings, record labels developed and tested a series of products between 2006 and 2008: MVI (Musical Video Interactive, a DVD filled with audio, video and interactive content), connected CDs, digital album cards (branded, physical cards with a download code), music placed on storage devices for your flip phone and a few others.

NPD Group surveyed consumers on behalf of Music Business Association (MBA), then called the National Association of Record Merchants (NARM). To its credit, the industry publicized the results of these tests through NARM. Although no product achieved the purchase interest of the CD, a few looked promising, especially for committed buyers.

One product tested less well: vinyl.

Vinyl concepts were tested in 2006 next to early versions of connected CDs and CD/DVD hybrids. This version of vinyl included a digital download card that would allow the buyer to download the album’s digital tracks. Of all the products tested between 2006 and 2008, vinyl tested the worst. There were ample problems. Vinyl had the lowest purchase interest. It didn’t particularly appeal to any important fan segments. And it wasn’t seen as a valuable item. More people expected to pay less for vinyl than were willing to pay a premium.

To read the rest of the article at billboard.com, click here

Darrell Banks 45 single

Northern Soul fans are bidding more than £11,000 for a rare 7-inch record, a week before its online auction ends.

The London Records’ pressing of Darrell Banks’ club classic Open the Door to Your Heart is thought to be the only copy in circulation.

It had been thought that all the original versions were destroyed when rival label EMI won the rights to release the track in 1966.

Fans described the record as “the find of a lifetime”.

John Manship, who has been selling rare vinyl since 1969 and runs the RareSoulMan website, told BBC News online it was the “holy grail” for record collectors.

He said nobody believed the “mythical” single existed – and that his pulse was racing when he realised it was the “most exciting record” he had sold in his 48-year career.

The owner, who had worked at Decca Records in the 1960s, turned down an offer for £10,000 to part with it instantly.

Click here to read the rest of the BBC news article

Drive (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) was released in CD format to stores on September 27, 2011 by Lakeshore Records, and owned by Cutting Edge Film Scores. Prior to that, thanks to viral reviews, such as those found on social networking website Twitter, the soundtrack sold well on iTunes, climbing as high as number four on the sales charts.

The nineteen-track album has amassed positive reviews. James Verniere of the Boston Herald graded it an A, stating, “The cool crowd isn’t just watching Drive; they’re listening to it, too… The Drive soundtrack is such an integral part of the experience of the film, once you see it, you can’t imagine the film without it.”Allmusic reviewer James Christopher Monger selected opening track “Nightcall”, “I Drive”, “Hammer” and “Bride of Deluxe” as highlights on it. Digital Spy’s Mayer Nissim gave it a four out of five star rating, finding it to be as important as the film itself. She stated the album beginning with non-Martinez songs instead of mixing it up for a more enjoyable listening experience cost it a star.

  • On 180 gram PINK vinyl
  • Double Lp
  • limited repress by Invada Records

Dawn Sears 1961-2014

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Dawn Sears (December 7, 1961 – December 11, 2014) was an American country music artist.

In addition to her work as a backing vocalist in Vince Gill’s band, she recorded three solo studio albums, of which two were released on major labels.

She charted one single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts.

Sears was born in East Grand Forks, Minnesota.

She began her career in 1990 with the album What a Woman Wants to Hear on Warner Bros. Records. The album produced three minor singles.

Because of her debut album’s poor performance, Sears had decided to leave the country music scene. However, she later received a call from Vince Gill, who had asked her to join his road band as a harmony vocalist.

In addition to singing harmony on Gill’s 1993 album I Still Believe in You, Sears provided duet vocals on the track “An Out of Control Raging Fire” on Tracy Byrd’s 1994 debut album.

In 1994, she was signed as the first act on Decca Records’ newly revived country music branch. Her second album, 1994’s Nothin’ But Good, was issued on Decca, and its lead-off single, “Runaway Train”, entered the country music charts.

Other singles from the album were unsuccessful, and Dawn exited Decca’s roster not long afterward. A self-titled album was released independently in 2002.

Sears returned to her work as a backup vocalist for Gill. She made appearances on several of Gill’s albums, including his 2003 album Next Big Thing. Sears also performed in The Time Jumpers.

In February 2012, Sears was diagnosed with lung cancer, which was diagnosed as Stage 3B in March 2013.

She died in Gallatin, Tennessee on December 11, 2014, aged 53.

Sears was married to Kenny Sears (a Time Jumpers bandmate), and had a daughter, Tess.

The Shure M44-7 cartridge is a legendary piece of DJ equipment. Although it has long been marketed as having been ”engineered for scratch DJs and turntablists,” with “ultra high” skip resistance and “ultra low” record wear, the Shure M44-7 pre-dates the advent of hip-hop by a few decades, having first been introduced on to the market way back in 1963.

Since then, the M44-7 has held its position a widely popular piece of kit amongst DJs of all types. The needle was redeveloped by Shure in the ’80s before being re-marketed towards turntablists, and has maintained its popularity in recent years due to its suitability for reading control vinyl used with software such as Scratch Live and Traktor.

The Shure M44-7 cartridge is a legendary piece of DJ equipment. Although it has long been marketed as having been ”engineered for scratch DJs and turntablists,” with “ultra high” skip resistance and “ultra low” record wear, the Shure M44-7 pre-dates the advent of hip-hop by a few decades, having first been introduced on to the market way back in 1963.

Since then, the M44-7 has held its position a widely popular piece of kit amongst DJs of all types. The needle was redeveloped by Shure in the ’80s before being re-marketed towards turntablists, and has maintained its popularity in recent years due to its suitability for reading control vinyl used with software such as Scratch Live and Traktor.

The video above shows what happens when you drop an M44-7 on to a record in slow motion. Shot at 500 frames per second, the video highlights the needle’s excellent and intricate suspension system, which has proved to be a major factor in the M44-7′s enduring success.

Source: Fact/The Vinyl Factory/YouTube

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